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Osteoporosis

Tea and Bones

16 years, 7 months ago

2012  0
Posted on Oct 08, 2002, 5 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Researchers at the University of Cambridge School of Medicine and Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, England report findings which suggest that tea drinkers have higher bone-mineral density than people who don't regularly drink tea. Of 1,256 women ages 65 to 76, 1,134 women classified as tea drinkers had significantly greater bone mineral density in all areas studied, except for the neck bone.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge School of Medicine and Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, England report findings which suggest that tea drinkers have higher bone-mineral density than people who don't regularly drink tea. Of 1,256 women ages 65 to 76, 1,134 women classified as tea drinkers had significantly greater bone mineral density in all areas studied, except for the neck bone. Researchers say these findings were independent of whether the women smoked, used hormone replacement therapy, drank coffee or added milk to their tea. However, drinking more tea didn't mean an even higher bone mineral density.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, April 2000

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