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Neurology

Scientists Find Key to Controlling Nerve Regeneration

21 years, 4 months ago

10282  0
Posted on Oct 11, 2002, 6 a.m. By Bill Freeman

It has been thought that nerves in the central nervous system (CNS) are typically unable to regenerate or re-grow after they have been damaged. However, researchers have found the molecular mechanism that controls nerve cell growth - Inosine, a chemical found in low-levels in the brain, promotes extensive nerve cell growth in rats with spinal cord injuries.

It has been thought that nerves in the central nervous system (CNS) are typically unable to regenerate or re-grow after they have been damaged. However, researchers have found the molecular mechanism that controls nerve cell growth - Inosine, a chemical found in low-levels in the brain, promotes extensive nerve cell growth in rats with spinal cord injuries. Further studies showed that inosine regulates the genes responsible for the repair of damaged nerves, thus regenerative nerve re-growth in humans could be achieved by activating nerve cells with the chemical. They researchers speculated that a treatment to restore function after major spinal injury could be available within 5 - 10 years.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.bbc.co.uk/news on the 1st November 2000

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