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Neurology

Scientists Attempt to Repair Spinal Cord Injury with Nose Cells

21 years, 4 months ago

9216  0
Posted on Oct 11, 2002, 6 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Australian researchers have carried out a pioneering 8-hour operation to try to repair a severed spinal cord using cells obtained from the patients nose. The researchers transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells, which are found inside the nasal passage, into the spinal cord of a paraplegic. In total, fourteen million cells were dissolved in two drops of fluid and transplanted into several areas of the patient's injured spinal cord.

Australian researchers have carried out a pioneering 8-hour operation to try to repair a severed spinal cord using cells obtained from the patients nose. The researchers transplanted olfactory ensheathing cells, which are found inside the nasal passage, into the spinal cord of a paraplegic. In total, fourteen million cells were dissolved in two drops of fluid and transplanted into several areas of the patient's injured spinal cord. Previous studies on rats had already shown that the cells encourage regeneration of injured spinal cords. The researchers do not expect the transplant to "cure" the patient, however they do hope that the transplant "will do something positive." Study leader Dr Chris Perry hopes that the operation will help the patient to regain some feeling and possibly improve their bladder and bowel function.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.reutershealth.com on the 12th July 2002

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