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Longevity Genetic Research Mechanisms of Aging

Genes Reveal Clues On Longevity

4 months, 1 week ago

2340  0
Posted on Jan 16, 2019, 12 a.m.

Experts claim to be able to predict whether a person can expect to live longer or die sooner than average by looking at an individual’s DNA and analyzing combined effects of genetic variants which influence lifespan, using a scoring system they have created; those in the top 10% of the population may live up to 5 years longer than those who score the lowest, as published in eLife.

Experts from the University of Edinburgh’s Usher Institute have created a scoring system based on combined effects of genetic variations that influence lifespan; and revealed new insights into disease and biological mechanisms involved in aging.

Genetic data from upwards of a half a million people was examined alongside records of their parent’s lifespan; some 12 areas of the human genome were pinpointed as having significant impact on lifespan including 5 sites which have not been previously reported. DNA sites with greatest impact on overall lifespan were those previously linked to fatal illnesses including heart disease and smoking related conditions; genes linked to other cancers not directly linked to smoking did not show up in this study, suggesting susceptibility to death caused by these cancers is either result of social and/or environmental factors, or as result of rarer genetic differences in affected people.

This study was conducted in hopes to discover genes that directly influence how quickly people age, it was noted if such genes exist their effects were too small to be detected in this study; and genes that affect the brain and heart were found to be responsible for most of the variations in lifespan.

Materials provided by University of Edinburgh.

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

Paul RHJ Timmers, Ninon Mounier, Kristi Lall, Krista Fischer, Zheng Ning, Xiao Feng, Andrew D Bretherick, David W Clark, M Agbessi, H Ahsan, I Alves, A Andiappan, P Awadalla, A Battle, MJ Bonder, D Boomsma, M Christiansen, A Claringbould, P Deelen, J van Dongen, T Esko, M Favé, L Franke, T Frayling, SA Gharib, G Gibson, G Hemani, R Jansen, A Kalnapenkis, S Kasela, J Kettunen, Y Kim, H Kirsten, P Kovacs, K Krohn, J Kronberg-Guzman, V Kukushkina, Z Kutalik, M Kähönen, B Lee, T Lehtimäki, M Loeffler, U Marigorta, A Metspalu, J van Meurs, L Milani, M Müller-Nurasyid, M Nauck, M Nivard, B Penninx, M Perola, N Pervjakova, B Pierce, J Powell, H Prokisch, BM Psaty, O Raitakari, S Ring, S Ripatti, O Rotzschke, S Ruëger, A Saha, M Scholz, K Schramm, I Seppälä, M Stumvoll, P Sullivan, A Teumer, J Thiery, L Tong, A Tönjes, J Verlouw, PM Visscher, U Võsa, U Völker, H Yaghootkar, J Yang, B Zeng, F Zhang, M Agbessi, H Ahsan, I Alves, A Andiappan, P Awadalla, A Battle, MJ Bonder, D Boomsma, M Christiansen, A Claringbould, P Deelen, J van Dongen, T Esko, M Favé, L Franke, T Frayling, SA Gharib, G Gibson, G Hemani, R Jansen, A Kalnapenkis, S Kasela, J Kettunen, Y Kim, H Kirsten, P Kovacs, K Krohn, J Kronberg-Guzman, V Kukushkina, Z Kutalik, M Kähönen, B Lee, T Lehtimäki, M Loeffler, U Marigorta, A Metspalu, J van Meurs, L Milani, M Müller-Nurasyid, M Nauck, M Nivard, B Penninx, M Perola, N Pervjakova, B Pierce, J Powell, H Prokisch, BM Psaty, O Raitakari, S Ring, S Ripatti, O Rotzschke, S Ruëger, A Saha, M Scholz, K Schramm, I Seppälä, M Stumvoll, P Sullivan, A Teumer, J Thiery, L Tong, A Tönjes, J Verlouw, PM Visscher, U Võsa, U Völker, H Yaghootkar, J Yang, B Zeng, F Zhang, Xia Shen, Tõnu Esko, Zoltán Kutalik, James F Wilson, Peter K Joshi. Genomics of 1 million parent lifespans implicates novel pathways and common diseases and distinguishes survival chances. eLife, 2019; 8 DOI: 10.7554/eLife.39856

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