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Neurology

Brain Can Form New Memory Nerves

21 years, 4 months ago

9191  0
Posted on Oct 10, 2002, 6 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Results of a new study have shown that the growth of new nerves in the brain is linked to a specific type of memory in adult rats, a discovery that may bring scientists one step closer to curing the memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Researchers investigating a type of memory called trace conditioning, which involves the area of the brain known as the hippocampus, discovered that blocking the growth of new nerves in the area impaired trace conditioning, however the damage could be reversed by cultivating the growth of new nerves.

Results of a new study have shown that the growth of new nerves in the brain is linked to a specific type of memory in adult rats, a discovery that may bring scientists one step closer to curing the memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Researchers investigating a type of memory called trace conditioning, which involves the area of the brain known as the hippocampus, discovered that blocking the growth of new nerves in the area impaired trace conditioning, however the damage could be reversed by cultivating the growth of new nerves. Experts say the findings demonstrate that newly incorporated neurons can become functional in the already existing circuit of the nervous system.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Nature 2001; 410:314-315, 372-376

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