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Minerals

Sodium (Sodium Chloride, Salt)

13 years, 1 month ago

1274  0
Posted on Dec 30, 2005, 8 p.m. By Bill Freeman

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Sodium is most commonly obtained from table salt and sea salt. However, it is also found in many types of food, especially foods from animal sources, including, shellfish, meat poultry, milk, and cheese. Other sources of sodium are kelp, powdered seaweed, and most processed foods.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Sodium is most commonly obtained from table salt and sea salt. However, it is also found in many types of food, especially foods from animal sources, including, shellfish, meat poultry, milk, and cheese. Other sources of sodium are kelp, powdered seaweed, and most processed foods.

ROLE IN ANTI-AGING:

Sodium works with potassium to maintain proper fluid balance between cells. It is an electrolyte, and is vital component of nerves as it stimulates muscle contraction. Sodium also helps to keep calcium and other minerals soluble in the blood, as well as stimulating the adrenal glands. High sodium levels can cause high blood pressure. Finally, sodium aids in preventing heat prostration or sunstroke.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:

Sodium deficiencies are rare since most foods contain sodium, however, symptoms include headaches, excessive sweating, heat exhaustion, respiratory failure, muscular cramps, weakness, collapsed blood vessels, stomach and intestinal gas, chronic diarrhea, weight loss, kidney failure, tuberculosis of kidneys, and streptococci infections.

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:

Supplementary sodium is rarely needed, as an ordinary diet provides enough sodium. A gram of sodium chloride has been suggested for each kilogram of water ingested. RDA is 200-600mg.

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL:

The RDA should not be exceeded as sodium toxicity can be serious.

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS:

Sodium only causes side effects when taken in excess.

SOLUBILITY: Water-soluble

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