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Other Vital Nutraceuticals & Nutrients

Saponins

13 years, 6 months ago

4609  0
Posted on Dec 30, 2005, 8 p.m. By Bill Freeman

GENERAL DESCRIPTION: Saponins are a group of plant chemicals found in found in soybeans, chickpeas, asparagus, tomatoes, potatoes, and oats. In nature, saponins appear to act as antibiotics that protect plants from microbes. In humans, saponins might fight cancer and infection. ROLE IN ANTI-AGING: Several in vitro and in vivo studies have found evidence to support the belief that saponins have potent anticarcinogenic properties.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Saponins are a group of plant chemicals found in found in soybeans, chickpeas, asparagus, tomatoes, potatoes, and oats. In nature, saponins appear to act as antibiotics that protect plants from microbes. In humans, saponins might fight cancer and infection.

ROLE IN ANTI-AGING:

Several in vitro and in vivo studies have found evidence to support the belief that saponins have potent anticarcinogenic properties. It is though that saponins protect against cancers via a range of different mechanisms, including an overall antioxidant effect, direct and select cytotoxicity of cancer cells, immune-modulation, and regulation of cell proliferation.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS: Not applicable

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:

Depends upon preparation - refer to packaging.

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL:

Do not exceed recommended dosage, as saponins are highly toxic.

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS:

The majority of saponins cause some degree of bloating. They can also cause nausea and diaarhea. Pregnant women and people who are anemic or who have other blood disorders should not take saponins without consulting their doctor.

Transfer Factors

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

Transfer factors were discovered by HS Lawrence in 1949, when he found that the immune fraction of an individual’s white blood cells was able to transfer immunity to a non-sensitized person. As small messenger molecules, transfer factors conduct immune recognition signals between immune cells. In doing so, they help "educate" young immune cells about present or potential danger. The most abundant source of transfer factors is colostrum, the "first milk" of humans and other animals such as cows.

ROLE IN ANTI-AGING:

Transfer factors have been used to treat bacterial and viral infections, parasites, and fungal disease. Research has shown that transfer factors are effective in treating chronic sinusitis, viral hepatitis, chronic candidiasis, chronic infection, otitis media, AIDS, and other viral infections. Other conditions that may benefit from treatment with transfer factors include cancer, asthma, allergic conditions, autoimmune disease, vaccinationinduced illness, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

DEFICIENCY SYMPTOMS:

Vulnerability to infection

THERAPEUTIC DAILY AMOUNT:

Standard transfer factors, use for preventive purposes, are balanced preparations with no one factor predominating. Refer to dosage instruction on packaging or use as directed by a physician.

MAXIMUM SAFE LEVEL: Not established

SIDE EFFECTS/CONTRAINDICATIONS:

Transfer factors may cause flu-like symptoms in some individuals.

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