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Nordic Diet Lowers Cholesterol And Blood Sugar – Even If You Don't Lose Weight

2 months, 1 week ago

5093  0
Posted on Mar 11, 2022, 3 p.m.

A healthy Nordic diet can prevent a range of diseases. Until now, the health benefits attributed to a Nordic diet by researchers primarily focused on weight loss. But in a new study, University of Copenhagen researchers and their Nordic colleagues found clear evidence that a Nordic diet can lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels even without weight loss. In particular, they point to the composition of dietary fats as a possible explanation for the diet’s positive effects.

Berries, veggies, fish, whole grains, and rapeseed oil. These are the main ingredients of the Nordic diet concept that, for the past decade, have been recognized as extremely healthy, tasty, and sustainable. The diet can prevent obesity and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

Until now, Nordic diet research has primarily been linked to the diet's positive health effect following weight loss. But a new analysis conducted by University of Copenhagen researchers, among others, makes it clear that a Nordic diet has positive health benefits -- regardless of whether one loses weight or not.

"It's surprising because most people believe that positive effects on blood sugar and cholesterol are solely due to weight loss. Here, we have found this not to be the case. Other mechanisms are also at play," explains Lars Ove Dragsted, a researcher and head of the section at the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise, and Sports.

Together with researchers from Finland, Norway, Sweden, and Iceland, Dragsted examined blood and urine samples from 200 people over the age of 50, all with elevated BMI and increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The participants were divided into two groups -- one provided foods according to Nordic dietary recommendations and a control group on their habitual diet. After six months of monitoring, the result was clear.

"The group that had been on the Nordic diet for six months became significantly healthier, with lower cholesterol levels, lower overall levels of both saturated and unsaturated fat in the blood, and better regulation of glucose, compared to the control group. We kept the group on the Nordic diet weight stable, meaning that we asked them to eat more if they lost weight. Even without weight loss, we could see an improvement in their health," explains Lars Ove Dragsted.

The fat makes us healthy

Instead of weight loss alone, the researchers point to the unique composition of fats in a Nordic diet as a possible explanation for the significant health benefits.

"By analyzing the blood of participants, we could see that those who benefited most from the dietary change had different fat-soluble substances than the control group. These are substances that appear to be linked to unsaturated fatty acids from oils in the Nordic diet. This is a sign that Nordic dietary fats probably play the most significant role for the health effects seen here, which I hadn't expected," says Lars Ove Dragsted.

Fats in the Nordic diet come from fish, flaxseeds, sunflower, and rapeseed (Canola), among other things. As a whole, they constitute a very beneficial mix for the body, although the researchers have yet to accurately explain why these fats seem to lower both blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

"We can only speculate as to why a change in fat composition benefits our health so greatly. However, we can confirm that the absence of highly processed food and less saturated fats from animals have a very positive effect on us. So, the fat composition in the Nordic diet, which is higher in omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fats, is probably a considerable part of the explanation for the health effects we find from the Nordic diet, even when the weight of participants remains constant," concludes Lars Ove Dragsted.

Facts about the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations

The Nordic Nutrition Recommendations were adopted by dietary experts in 2012 and will be updated this year.

The diet is adapted to the Nordic countries: Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Greenland, the Faroe Islands, and Iceland. The diet is based on ingredients that are produced locally and are thereby sustainable.

Recommended foods include vegetables such as peas, beans, cabbage, onions, and root vegetables, as well as fruits, including apples, pears, plums, and berries. Also recommended are nuts, seeds, whole grains, fish, and shellfish, as well as vegetable oils made from rapeseed, sunflower, or flaxseed. Finally, low-fat dairy products are also recommended, as well as a significantly smaller proportion of meat than currently consumed.

The diet contributes to important fatty acids, minerals, vitamins, and plant materials that have a positive effect on our health and, among other things, reduce the risk of blood clots, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as cardiovascular disease in general.

Weight loss in relation to a Nordic diet

The researchers stress that weight loss, which frequently results from a Nordic dietary pattern, remains very important for the diet's overall health benefits.

"This study simply shows that it is not only weight loss that leads to the benefits of this diet. The unique composition of fats plays an important role as well," says Lars Ove Dragsted.

As with anything you read on the internet, this article should not be construed as medical advice; please talk to your doctor or primary care provider before making any changes to your wellness routine.

Content may be edited for style and length.

Materials provided by:

https://science.ku.dk/english/press/news/2022/nordic-diet-lowers-cholesterol-and-blood-sugar--even-if-you-dont-lose-weight/

https://science.ku.dk/english/

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2021.12.031

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0261561421005963?via%3Dihub

ldra@nexs.ku.dk

maho@science.ku.dk

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