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Cardio-Vascular Diabetes Nutrition

Food packaging plastic linked to diabetes, liver abnormalities, and heart disease

11 years, 2 months ago

2314  0
Posted on Sep 19, 2008, 7 a.m. By Rich Hurd

The results of the first human study of bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical commonly found in plastic food and drink packaging, suggest that high levels of the chemical increases the risk of diabetes, liver abnormalities, and heart disease.

The results of the first human study of bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical commonly found in plastic food and drink packaging, suggest that high levels of the chemical increases the risk of diabetes, liver abnormalities, and heart disease.

The study of 1,455 men and women was designed to examine associations between urinary BPA concentrations and adult health status. Results showed that participants with the highest concentrations of BPA were nearly three times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than those with the lowest levels, and 2.4 times more likely to have diabetes. Higher BPA levels were also associated with “clinically abnormal” concentrations of the liver enzymes γ-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase.

In August this year the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a draft report by FDA scientists concluding that the amount of BPA humans typically consume in food and drinks does not pose a health risk. However, in light of the recent controversy surrounding the chemical the FDA, which has been heavily criticized because of its stance on this issue, held a meeting on Tuesday September 16th to discuss BPA and its alleged deleterious effects upon health. “Right now, our tentative conclusion is that it's safe, so we're not recommending any change in habits," said Laura Tarantino, head of the FDA's office of food additive safety.

Lang IA, Galloway TS, Scarlett A, Henley WE, Depledge M, Wallace RB, Melzer D. Association of urinary bisphenol a concentration with medical disorders and laboratory abnormalities in adults. JAMA. 2008;300:1303-1310.

 

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