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Fly Jet Lag Free: New Jetliner Technology Emphasizes Human Factors

10 years, 4 months ago

736  0
Posted on May 20, 2008, 4 p.m. By Donna Sorbello

The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner will be the first of a new generation of commercial aircraft provided with a number of new technologies to increase comfort and reduce jet-lag. Human-factors engineers have designed LED lighting that can fade slowly to help passengers set their sleep cycles, and better filtration technology for cleaner air. Recreating conditions closer to those at sea level, cabin pressure will be higher and the air will have higher humidity.

The new Boeing 787 Dreamliner will be the first of a new generation of commercial aircraft provided with a number of new technologies to increase comfort and reduce jet-lag. Human-factors engineers have designed LED lighting that can fade slowly to help passengers set their sleep cycles, and better filtration technology for cleaner air. Recreating conditions closer to those at sea level, cabin pressure will be higher and the air will have higher humidity.

Taking off on a long flight? Then you probably try things to fight jet lag. But preventing the effects of jet lag may soon be a matter of simply the plane you take off in. This new Boeing 787 Dreamliner is designed to make you feel more refreshed when you reach your destination.

Plenty of room and a smooth ride are key to a passenger's comfort, but with help from human factors engineers, passengers are surrounded by technologies to help them fight jet lag, like lighting to mimic sunrise and sunset. A new filtration system means cleaner air. The air will have higher humidity and lower cabin pressure, which helps passengers feel less tired after a long flight.

"The architecture is very, very open in this airplane, and that's important in making people feel comfortable and rested when they land," Boeing Engineer Kenneth Price tells DBIS. "Because LED lights can do a very slow fade down into the nighttime environment and a very slow fade back to the daytime environment, passengers can fall asleep much more naturally and wake up much more naturally, which helps set their sleep cycles."

...And help make an effortless transition to their destination.

The first test flight for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is set for August 2007. It should be ready for commercial use in mid-2008. Northwest, Continental and other airlines have already ordered the planes.

RESOURCE/SOURCE:  ScienceDaily on February 1, 2007

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