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Stroke

Antibiotics Reduce Stroke Risk by One-Fifth

14 years, 10 months ago

947  0
Posted on Jan 29, 2004, 10 a.m. By Bill Freeman

New research suggests that antibiotics could cut the risk of stroke by one-fifth. Dr Paul Brassard of Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, Canada, and colleagues compared antibiotic use between 1888 stroke patients and 9440 similar people who had not had a stroke. Results showed that people who had used antibiotics within the previous year were approximately 20% less likely to have a stroke that those who had not taken the drugs.

New research suggests that antibiotics could cut the risk of stroke by one-fifth. Dr Paul Brassard of Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, Canada, and colleagues compared antibiotic use between 1888 stroke patients and 9440 similar people who had not had a stroke. Results showed that people who had used antibiotics within the previous year were approximately 20% less likely to have a stroke that those who had not taken the drugs. Although several antibiotics appeared to reduce the risk of stroke penicillins, such as amoxicillin and ampicillin, were the most effective at reducing stroke risk. Furthermore, those who were taking penicillins at the time of the study were 47% less likely to have a stroke. Scientists believe that antibiotics kill bacteria present in atherosclerotic plaques that develop in arteries. The presence of these bacteria is thought to increase the risk of plaque rupture, thus if an antibiotic can kill these bacteria the plaque should become more stable and therefore less likely to cause a stroke.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Stroke, Aug 2003; 10.1161/01.STR.0000085831.91042.BF
Published online before print August 7th, 2003.

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