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Longevity

21st Century Born Men May Outlive Women

15 years, 9 months ago

1399  0
Posted on Jun 30, 2003, 11 a.m. By Bill Freeman

Men could soon be outliving women, according to experts from the UK. Recently published research has shown that male mortality is improving much more quickly than female mortality. The life expectancy of men has increased steadily in recent years, whereas that of women is increasing at a much slower rate, thus the life expectancy gap between the sexes is getting smaller and smaller.

Men could soon be outliving women, according to experts from the UK. Recently published research has shown that male mortality is improving much more quickly than female mortality. The life expectancy of men has increased steadily in recent years, whereas that of women is increasing at a much slower rate, thus the life expectancy gap between the sexes is getting smaller and smaller. In fact, in Britain this gap is just three years. Figures from the British Office for National Statistics show that men aged 65 in 2000 can expect to live to 81, while women can expect to live to 84 years old. Study leader Tony Leandro, of the Continuous Mortality Investigation Bureau at the Institute of Actuaries, believes that if this current trend continues, boys born in the late 21st century will have a greater life expectancy than baby girls. Leandro suspects that high levels of smoking among young women could be to blame for the slowing down of life expectancy increase in women. Meanwhile, Adrian Galop of the Government Actuaries Department suggests that the fact that more women are now working may also be an important factor. He believes that stress in the workplace "may also have contributed to the recent decline in the differential." Several studies have linked stress to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

SOURCE/REFERENCE: Reported by www.bbc.co.uk on the 23rd June 2003.

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